Impact measurement is critical to everything we do at Justice and Care. We don’t just measure our activity, but we rigorously evaluate the change our activities are making.

All of our work is focused on testing and proving what really works in the fight against human trafficking, and then leveraging what works to drive systemic change at scale.

Through our direct work and joint operations, our headline impact to date includes:


5,014 Victims removed from exploitation


1,334 Accused Traffickers Arrested


1,275 Prosecutions of Exploiters Supported



153 Exploiters Convicted


4,588 Survivors Supported


51,164 Front-line Professionals Trained



176,013 Vulnerable people provided with prevention education



251 Supported safe returns


Definitions:

‘Survivors cared for’ – the number of individual victims who have had multiple instances of specialist support from our teams.

‘Survivors rehabilitated’ – the number of survivors cared for who have now reached a stable point of reintegration and independence.

‘Victims rescued’ – the number of victims rescued where our teams supported the police or rescuing authority with intelligence, tactical advice, or direct assistance during the intervention.

‘Arrests’ – the number of suspected perpetrators arrested where our teams supported the police or rescuing authority with intelligence, tactical advice, or direct assistance during the intervention.

‘Prosecutions’ – the number of suspected perpetrators brought to trial for any offence related to the exploitation of a victim, where our teams supported the arrest or provided support to the victim and/or prosecutor during the legal process.

‘Convictions’ – the number of perpetrators convicted for any offence related to the exploitation of a victim, where our teams supported the arrest or provided support to the victim and/or prosecutor during the legal process.

‘Vulnerable people reached’ – number of specifically vulnerable people reached with targeted prevention awareness training or more holistic direct support.

Critical outcomes:

To ensure our programmes are effective, we measure outcomes like the recovery and reintegration of survivors we care for; engagement of survivors with law enforcement; re-trafficking rates and behaviour change amongst professionals trained.

Systemic change impact

Justice and Care’s Theory of Change is premised on the need to conduct outstanding, innovative frontline casework in partnership with law enforcement – but crucially to leverage the lessons about what works on the ground to drive systemic change at scale.

Within our programmes, we seek to drive practice change amongst law enforcement and stakeholders we work with – while our Joint Unit and International Systemic Change Unit translate lessons and research from the field into evidence-based policy recommendations to influence governments and decision-makers at national levels.

Examples of our systemic change work include:

  • Introducing a new procedure for repatriated victims in Bangladesh to be interviewed by law enforcement in a trauma-informed way via videoconference – ensuring their evidence is not lost and their traffickers can be pursued
  • Reviewing on behalf of the Government of Bangladesh the backlog of human trafficking cases in the country and making recommendations for addressing the bottlenecks in the system
  • Analysing the extent of modern slavery in the UK using police data – revealing that prevalence is approximately 10 times previous estimates – a crucial insight welcomed by the Home Office
  • Introducing a new procedure with Border Force UK to enable early identification of potential trafficking victims and offenders at the Port of Dover
  • Creating a Foundation Skills Course to help bridge the transition into mainstream vocational training for victims of trafficking in India – soon to be rolled out in shelter homes across the State of Karnataka
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