Our impact

Understanding the impact we make and interventions that work and those that don’t is really important to us – it is core to our approach of using our frontline experience to spark change at scale. 

In everything we do, we therefore seek to be clear, honest and accountable. Our impact reporting is rigorous and robust – and purposely so, because it matters. We interrogate our data, use independent evaluations to validate our achievements and share openly what worked and what didn’t, seeking to constantly improve. 

These figures speak for themselves – they are just a small sample of the things we measure to be able to understand the impact we are making:

5,223
survivors freed
4,567
survivors supported
612
survivors brought home
209
exploiters convicted
1,564
accused traffickers arrested
1,659
prosecutions supported
181,912
vulnerable people educated
58,638
frontline professionals trained

What’s included? 

We’ve thought deeply about what to measure when it comes to our impact. We never share data without being able to confidently back it up. Because we work so closely in partnership with others, such as the police, to achieve change we only count things when we have had a very clear role in delivering them. These are the definitions we use:

  • We measure the number of victims rescued where our teams supported the police or rescuing authority with intelligence, tactical advice, or direct assistance during the intervention.

  • We count the number of individual victims who have had multiple instances of specialist support from our teams.

  • We help survivors return home. We count the number of victims of modern slavery safely repatriated under the oversight and assistance of our teams. 

  • This is the number of perpetrators convicted for any offence related to the exploitation of a victim, where our teams provided support to the victim and/or prosecutor in relation to the legal process.

  • We count the number of suspected perpetrators arrested where our teams supported the police or rescuing authority with intelligence, tactical advice, or direct assistance during the intervention.

  • We report on suspected perpetrators brought to trial for any offence related to the exploitation of a victim, where our teams provided support to the victim and/or prosecutor in relation to the legal process. This figure includes ongoing cases. 

  • This relates to the number of specifically vulnerable people reached, through our work, with targeted prevention awareness training or more holistic direct support. We don’t include those reached through media awareness programmes. 

  • This relates to the number of law enforcement or other professionals interacting directly with victims in their professional practice, trained in victim identification or victim care by our teams. 

  • Whether helping a Government to draft new laws, offering expert advice at high level forums, or influencing operating procedures at an organisational level, we keep a close eye on the changes we achieve at scale. We report systemic change primarily in a qualitative way – speaking to key stakeholders to track what has changed and measure our unique contribution. We do that because it is so hard to quantify the impact made.  We never claim more credit than is due. As much of these systemic changes take place in increments, and often behind closed doors, our impact in this area is a deeply significant but constantly evolving story.

Our six month impact reports

Twice a year we produce a short impact report for our investors. You can read our latest versions here: 

March – August 2022

September 2021 – February 2022

March – August 2021

September 2020 – February 2021